Open Letter to Rep. Mike Coffman

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House Representative Mike Coffman (R-CO) is my elected official in the House of Representatives. I recently asked you to write your congress representatives to support raising our debt ceiling for a variety of reasons. Here is my letter. Feel free to use part of it or all of it when emailing your Representative regarding this issue.

Mr. Coffman,

I am writing today regarding the current Washington debate over our national debt ceiling.

Like all off my friends and family, I am incredibly concerned by the childish behavior I have seen demonstrated by the Republican party regarding the debt ceiling. It appears that the party has become so obsessed with defeating Barack Obama that they have forgotten you were elected.

You were elected to make life better for American citizens.

Even Regan said that it would be irresponsible for congress to vote against raising the debt ceiling. I do not understand why the Republican party has become so hard line about protecting the top 2% from tax increases while the livelihoods of those 2% and the 98% of the rest of us hang in the balance.

I agree that the budget needs to be balanced, but it needs to be done so responsibly. A knee jerk reaction like defaulting on US debt obligations would cost at least $500 billion (just from lowering of US credit rating).

I know that you acted responsibly and helped the state of Colorado work through difficult situations as state treasurer. I believe that you, and at least 40-50 Republican House Representatives, are intelligent enough and understand the economy enough to protect us from irreparable harm.

Please vote to raise the debt ceiling today and put my fears, and the world’s fears, to rest.

Thank you,

Eric Rosenberg

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4 thoughts on “Open Letter to Rep. Mike Coffman”

  1. Bret @ Hope to Prosper

    This is a great letter, but it wasn’t only the Republicans who were acting irresponsibly.  The Democrats were also playing chicken with our future, in an attempt to sweep everything under the rug until after the 2012 election.  By that time, we would be another couple Trillion in debt.

    One very positive surprise to me was how President Obama handled the situation.  I didn’t expect him to be so responsible for the compromise, which is what our elected officials are supposed to do in an impasse.

    1. What bothered me this time was that the Democrats came up with a reasonably good plan and the Republicans would not budge. The “compromise” was really the Democrats giving in to save the economy. I think the Tea Party would have rather had an economic meltdown than compromise with Obama.

      1. Bret @ Hope to Prosper

        Eric,

        I disagree that the Democrats gave up everything to save the country.  Although, they did budge more than the Republicans, who gave up the balanced budget ammendment.  I think Joe lieberman said it best that both sides clinged to their ideology instead of doing what was right for America.  The Republicans refused to raise taxes while the Democrats refused to cut entitlements.  No matter what party you belong to (I’m Indepenent) both of those things will have to be done in order to balance the budget.  All of the finger pointing and partisan bickering won’t change it.

        1. I really liked the first Democratic proposal for (if memory serves) $3T in cuts and $1T in revenue increases.

          The Tea Party types (not all Republicans were as hard-line  though some were) would not even talk about anything that involved revenue increases. They have proven that they care more about cutting than actual services provided by their irresponsible vacation in the House of Representatives while the FAA is not able to collect any fees. This is costing our country $200 million a week. They do not care about deficits, they care about gutting the government.

          Yes, I do have very clear partisan leanings and biases, but I have been known to vote for Republicans on occasion and do not support all Democratic policies. In the end, with this case, it came down to an extremist views on taxation. I, for one, do not want extremists (on either side) dictating our government policies.

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